інтерв’ю: війна і арт
Nina Savenko
I feel as if my arms are broken, and with each murdered child, I feel it more.

How did the war on February 24 start for you? What was your morning like?

I was a little ready for this, I was warned, in the evening, that “something” was gonna happen in the morning. I did not believe in the full-scale [invasion], I understood immediately  when a friend from Odesa texted and said that they were also being shelled. My kid was very frightened, but when the whole family got together – she calmed down. I was in a calm and even talkative mood. I believed that this [war] would not last long. But somewhere deep down, in my stomach there was a cold, even freezing feeling. We agreed that we would not go anywhere.

What do you do during the war? Do you work or volunteer?

 The first three weeks of the war, my husband and I together with our friends volunteered to help children, their mothers, people with disabilities and old people with food, medicine, baby formula and hygiene products. Now I am in Lviv, trying to resume my creative work, and my friends and husband continue to volunteer in the capital.

Did you have to leave your home?

A week after staying in the bomb shelter, my child got sick and my husband’s mother became nervous, which worsened her health. That’s why we decided to send them to Lviv. A few weeks later, I was also forced to come here, as the parents with whom I sent the child decided to go elsewhere, and I insisted that the child must stay in Lviv. My husband remained in Kyiv.

How has your art changed since the beginning of the war?

I can hardly work. I can’t draw what others are living through and experiencing firsthand now. I would like to talk about the future. I have been talking about what is happening now for the last two years. So far, I’m trying to just imagine it in my head and make some sketches of my future plans and of what I believe in. Now I feel as if my arms are broken, and with each murdered child, I feel it more. Even physically, my hands just don’t move, I can’t feel my fingers, they just don’t move.

How did the war change you?

I don’t think I’ve changed. I just decided for myself that I would no longer spend my energy restraining my thoughts. And also I realized how much I love my home, and that I will never leave it.

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